PrintWave ~ Atlanta, GA Digital Printing Company

When Is Personal Too Personal?
One of the benefits of 1:1 marketing is the ability to increase the relevance of each communication by making the message more personal. By using the information you already know about the recipient, you can communicate on a more intimate, 1:1 level.

But this approach can also be misused. Individuals and businesses are very protective of their privacy these days, and rightly so. Customers want to know that their data is not only safe but that the marketers they do business with won't misuse it.

What are some first steps you can take to ensure that your customers and prospects know that you care about their privacy?

  • Include an official privacy statement in your information-gathering materials.
  • If you are collecting data, include a notice of physical and data security procedures and a promise of confidentiality.
  • When personalizing your marketing messages, don’t disclose overly personal details ("Hey, Bob! Ready to default on that sky-high mortgage?”).
  • Be transparent. Provide full details about what respondents have to do to receive any prizes or promotional items.
  • Follow all opt-in regulations, including double opt-ins for email lists and providing the option to opt-out of future marketing contacts.
  • Assure that respondents’ information will not be sold to third parties.

Privacy standards, both in print and online, are always evolving. So stay abreast of the discussion. Talk to your customers to find out any other concerns and address them. The more you can assure your customers that their personal information is safe with you and that it will be used appropriately, the more you will win their trust.




Best Practices in Personalized Marketing
f you want great marketing results, it’s important to personalize text, images, and other content based on what you know about the recipient. But just dropping in data-driven content doesn’t guarantee success. Sometimes other factors can dull your results. Maybe the offer is great, but the design is so uninteresting that nobody reads it. Or the headline is snappy and the design is great, but there is no incentive for people to respond. 

Let’s look at three best practices that need to be the foundation of any personalized print campaign. 

Traditional marketing rules apply. Even with personalized marketing, traditional rules hold firm. Ultimately, all of the elements — creative, message (including personalization), offer, segmentation, call to action, and incentive —need to come together to determine success.  

Focus on relevance, not "personalization.” It doesn’t matter how "personalized” a document is. If it isn’t relevant, it is worthless. Take the shoe market. You don’t want to sell orthopedic shoes to teenagers. You can deck out the mailer with text messaging terms, pictures of X-Games, and use all the contemporary lingo, but it’s not a relevant message unless a teen needs to purchase a birthday present for grandpa. 

Know your customers, then market to what you know. When the National Hockey League began 1:1 communication with its customers, it asked them to fill out a survey that indicated that 40% of the of NHL’s fan base lives outside their favorite team’s home market. That means these fans can’t easily go to games or access highlights. Imagine the opportunity for the league! So ask yourself, what don’t you know about your customers now that might allow you to create relevance in a more powerful way later? Do a customer mail or email survey. Use what you find out to speak directly to the needs and interests of your customers. 

Investing in your marketing database and developing an intimate understanding of your customers takes time, dedicated resources, and manpower, but it is one of the most important investments you can make. Personalization is a powerful tool, but to get the big pay-off, it cannot work alone.



Did You Know Personalized Printing is Green Printing?
When you think about personalization, do you think about lower cost per lead, higher per order values, and increased ROI? You should. But you should also get excited about how personalized printing helps you go green.

Here are three reasons why:

Targeting means you send out fewer pieces of mail—saving trees, chemicals, and fossil fuels.

A cleaner database means that your recipients deliver fewer pieces right to the trash can.

Digital production has many green benefits, including no plates, no chemicals, and no spray powders.

Say you are a small college printing four-color catalogs to mail to prospective students. Each catalog is 252 pages, covering the full range of disciplines and activities. As a result, only 25% of the material is relevant to the prospective student. Now, instead of printing 252 pages, you print 64 pages of material relevant to each student. Not only does this increase the effectiveness of each booklet, but you’ve just reduced your consumption of paper, ink, and chemicals by 75%.

As another example, in a static mail campaign, you might send out 15,000 postcards to a generic list. With personalized mail, you are likely to select only a percentage of that list. This might be the top 10% of your customers, customers who are most likely to purchase certain products or customers who, based on defined triggers (such as an expiring auto lease), are most likely to be in the market for a new purchase. Now, instead of mailing 15,000 pieces, you might mail only 1,500. Not only are these offers more targeted and relevant, but you’ve just reduced your printing and mailing volume by 90%, a huge slash in your carbon footprint.

It pays to be green. Not only should you consider green alternatives because it’s the right thing to do, but also because it’s good business. Consumers want to do business with companies that are good stewards of the environment.

So double marketing dip—personalize it!



3 Tips for Optimizing Your Multi-channel Marketing
Want to energize your print campaign? Combine print with other media to amplify its effect.

The most common channel pairing with print these days is email, but you might also want to consider text messaging, banner ads, social media (such as Facebook), and search engine advertising, as well. Each channel has different benefits depending on your marketing goals and the target audience you are trying to reach.

No matter which channels you choose, here are some basic guidelines to keep in mind:

1. Maintain consistent branding across all channels. Different media have different requirements, so you can’t maintain 100% cross-channel consistency all the time. But whenever possible, use the same images, color schemes, primary messaging, and offers to maintain a consistent brand image and a consistent brand message. 

2. Think strategically. Know what role each channel is supposed to play. If you are going to combine email with print, what are you trying to accomplish? Are you trying to create awareness and anticipation of the print piece? Are you using email as a reminder to respond? Maybe if you’re driving traffic to a campaign-specific website, you might want to consider banner advertising in demographic hot spots. 

3. Create appropriate channel-audience pairings. Ensure that you are selecting the best combination of channels to communicate with your target audience. You’re not going to reach as many retirees with text marketing as you are Millennials, for example, and social media preferences vary, as well. Sixty-five percent of GenXers and Baby Boomers say their favorite social media network is Facebook, and while Millennials overall prefer Facebook, too, among younger Millennials (ages 18-24), the favored social media network is Instagram.   

There is a learning curve associated with multi-channel marketing, but the ability to amplify and reinforce your marketing message can be invaluable. Need help matching your channels to your marketing goals? Just ask!



Why You Should Be Doing Event Marketing
Event marketing, including trade shows, seminars, and conferences, offers unique opportunities to engage customers and increase the visibility of your brand. Direct mail, email, social media, and other marketing channels each have a role to play in raising awareness about your company, but events have the ability to put everything together in a way that no channel, by itself, can do. 

A recent infographic by NCFE (Northern Council for Further Education) highlights three key benefits of event marketing every marketer should keep in mind. 

1. Events humanize your company.
 
Events do more than showcase your products and services. They showcase your brand’s personality. People like to buy from people, not just companies, so get consumers to like your brand’s personality and you will increase sales and win customers’ long-term loyalty. 
 
2. Events embed product information more deeply.
 
Events offer a multi-touch, multi-sensory experience that embeds information more deeply in customers’ memories. Studies of post-trade-show experiences, for example, show that consumers who have physically interacted with a product (such as in a product demo) are more likely to remember that product and remember it in more detail than products they learned about in a passive environment. Events let your target audience engage with your product in a dynamic way that increase their ability to recall it later. 
 
3. Events let you gather more demographic information.

 
Events create a fertile environment for gathering contact and demographic information you can use to target potential customers long after the event is over. Use registration forms, interactive booth or seminar games, badge scanning, and other techniques to gather as much information about attendees as possible. After all, they have just pre-qualified themselves as being high-value leads, so take advantage of this opportunity!

Want to learn more about event marketing and how to use booth graphics, displays, and marketing collateral to support your event marketing efforts? Let us show you how!



Effective Communication Breeds Customer Loyalty
If your company has high levels of customer satisfaction, they are likely to remain loyal, right? Wrong. 

In a customer satisfaction study of 10 major industries, an average of 72% of respondents indicated that they were highly satisfied with the products or services received. Yet 88% of the customers surveyed said that they were willing to switch providers for any reason!

Many of your competitors likely offer a quality product and service with prices and delivery standards that are similar to yours. In this fiercely competitive environment, how can you continuously attract and win new customers while fostering loyalty among your current ones? 

All things being equal, your customers will naturally go where they consistently feel well treated and appreciated.
You care about your clients, but what matters to them is how you show it. Demonstrating their value to you requires more than quality service and good prices. It requires strategic planning. It requires ongoing attentiveness and creativity in the quality of your communication. 

Direct mail is often viewed as a way of winning new customers, but its effectiveness as a customer loyalty tool should not be overlooked. It is powerful, relevant, and has a tangible cost. Sending direct mail (especially personalized mail) says to your customers, "You are worth the effort.” 

Consider setting up a series of "nurturing” mailers throughout the year. Make it a continuous client contact program that will demonstrate at regular, pre-planned intervals that you are sincerely grateful for their business and care about their relationship with you.

Use the data you’ve collected to communicate, cross-sell, educate, survey and grow your relationship with these customers. Offer useful tips, and send newsletters, press releases, case studies, company brochures and timely incentives that remind clients of your commitment to service, value, quality, innovation, and loyalty.

Direct mail isn’t just for customer acquisition marketing anymore. It is a critical part of effective customer retention efforts too. 



Questions to Ask Before Any Logo Redesign
A logo is the most visible graphical representation of a company.  It provides an anchor for the visual elements in all of your other marketing materials, and when associated with an excellent product or service, it can carry goodwill and brand awareness.  Conversely, if your logo has low brand recognition or a dated look, it’s time to consider a redesign. 

If you are considering a logo redesign, here are some things to discuss with your designer: 

  • What is your unique selling proposition? Where does your product fall on the quality versus price spectrum?  
  • Who are your competitors and target customers? 
  • What are your plans for how the logo will be used beyond business cards and stationery? This will allow the designer to create a logo that is appropriately scalable.  
  • If your logo relies on gradients, reflections, or other digital effects, how will it look embroidered on a shirt or imprinted on a promotional item? One test is to look at your logo in its simplest form.  Can it hold its own in black-and-white?  
  • Can digital enhancements be added for specific applications? 
Answering these questions will help your designer position your brand appropriately, both for the market and for the intended marketing uses.

But let creativity abound. There’s no single formula for creating an effective logo.  Consider the highly visible Microsoft, Olympic and Starbucks redesigns.  Microsoft unveiled its first new logo in a quarter of a century last year, adding a splash of color and a graphical element to its name. Similarly, the new Olympic logo spelled out Rio 2016 and used the yellow, green and blue of the Brazilian flag.  Contrast that with the latest Starbucks logo, which uses only one color and no reference to the Starbucks name or coffee.  The green, twin-tailed mermaid represents the brand’s personality rather than the product.  

If logo redesign is important to these marquee brands, it’s certainly something for your business to consider. However, test market any changes with your target audience before embarking on a full-scale redesign. The price of a logo redesign (again) is more than just the cost of the image. It’s the expense of rolling it out across your enterprise.

Need help? Let us brainstorm with you.


Effective Marketing Copy Made Easy
Whether you are writing copy for direct mail, email, in-store or exterior signage, or any other type of marketing material, a few simple tricks will increase your ability to grab your audience’s attention and communicate your message more effectively. Here are some fundamental principles of writing great copy that will help you command attention:
 
Be imaginative. It’s easy to say the same thing in the same way all the time. Break out of the mold. Look for unconventional ways to communicate your message. 

Be a salesperson. Cute and clever doesn’t get you anywhere by itself. Your copy still has to motivate recipients to action. Be creative, but also be clear. Sell benefits. Give an overt call to action. 

Put the customer front and center. Make the customer the center of the message. Talk about their problems, their challenges, and their bottlenecks. Let them identify with the message, and then talk about how your products and services can solve their problems.  

Build trust. Part of building a brand and gaining repeat customers is establishing loyalty and trust. Represent your products in a way that is accurate, helpful, and maintains your customers’ confidence.

Hire a professional editor. Make sure your copy meets professional standards. Someone who is "good at grammar” isn’t sufficient. When it comes to marketing, there are rules for punctuation, capitalization, and usage that only professionals know. 

Of course, there are other elements to great print marketing, as well. Good layout. Interesting graphics. Compelling offer. Great copy ties it all together.



Tips for Ordering Promotional Products
Promotional products, whether common items such as pens and refrigerator magnets or more unusual items such as branded toys or back scratchers, can be powerful components of a multichannel marketing campaign. They tend to be kept for longer periods of time than traditional marketing pieces and can be highly effective door openers for hard-to-reach targets, particularly in the C-Suite. But ordering promotional items isn’t like ordering print. Here is a quick checklist to make the most of your investment. 

1. Don’t overload the promotional item.
 
Keep it simple and don’t try to overload with copy or images. Often times, a logo and phone number is all you need. 

2. Avoid the rush. 

You may be used to being able to rush orders for brochures and direct mail, but promotional items require more lead time.  Plan at least several weeks in advance. 

3. Simplify your use of color. 

The differential between single-color and multicolor printing is relatively minimal. However, promotional items are generally imprinted using silkscreen or pad printing, and every color adds  more cost. Use single-color versions of graphics and logos to keep the cost down. 

4. Price breaks matter. 

In the world of commercial print, you don’t want to over-order product simply to get a price break, especially when considering the cost of obsolescence. Promotional items will go out of date less quickly, however, and the price breaks with volume can be substantial.  

5.  Dimension matters. 

Remember to take into consideration the final mailing cost. A more expensive promotional item that ships flat may cost less in the end than a lower priced but bulky item that needs to be mailed in a dimensional package. 
Want to learn more about best-in-class use of promotional items? Give us a call 770-433-2628.


5 Steps to Great Print Planning
Most successful printing projects don’t happen by accident. They start with a good plan. Here are 5 steps to ensuring that everything goes smoothly and on budget. 

1. What is the goal of the printed piece? 

Is the goal of the piece to entertain or inform? To impress? Your marketing goals influence the design and quality of the piece. Certain ideas may have a significant impact on turnaround or cost. For example, some binding options can take extra time, and certain trim sizes might incur extra expense. Paper choices can also affect the project cost and turnaround time.

2. Who is the audience, and how will they use the piece? 

If you are designing a flyer for a theatrical opening, it will look different than one promoting a rock concert. People read a book differently than they read a poster. Before setting anything in stone, talk to us to determine how your design decisions can affect the project budget and schedule.

3. How many suppliers are involved?

Take into account the schedules of any outside service providers. For example, if you are using a freelance illustrator or label designer, you need to take his or her availability into consideration. If you’re adhering a label to a bottle, you need to work with the bottle company to ensure that the bottles are available when you need them. 

4. When does the piece need to arrive? 

Always plan backwards from the delivery date. It’s particularly important to involve us in this part of the planning process so we can schedule your project. Because we juggle many jobs at any given time, your project needs gets to press in time to meet your deadline. If not, your job may get rescheduled behind other jobs, and especially if those jobs are large or complex, that can affect its mail or delivery date significantly. 

5. How much "fudge” do you need? 

Finally, you need to incorporate "fudge factor.” Always add in buffer time to accommodate slippage in the schedule. The larger the project, the more buffer you will need. 

The moral of the story? Good print planning starts with communicating early—and often. 



5 Updates to Freshen Up Direct Mail
Are you looking for ways to spice up your direct mail campaigns? Even if your response rates remain high, are you looking to freshen things up? Here are a few ways you can update your direct mailings and give them new appeal. 
 
1. Update the package.

Are you using the same envelopes you have for years? If so, change the color. Change the size. Add a personalized teaser on the front ("John, check this out!”). If you are selling high-value products, consider dimensional mail or novelty envelopes that look like UPS packages or USPS Priority Mail.
 
2. Tweak your text. 

Still using the same marketing text from last year? Try a new approach. If you’ve been using an informational style, insert some humor.  If you’ve been sending punchy one-liners, try adding more educational text. 
 
3. Freshen up the images. 

How long have you been using that same picture of your headquarters? Is your headshot on the back of the postcard from the 1990s? Take a new company photo. Upload a current headshot with a fabulous smile. Or maybe you just want some new images as backgrounds or illustration. 

4. Add a new variable. 

If you are personalizing your mailings, why not add a new variable? If you’ve been personalizing by name and gender, add age bracket or income. If you’ve been personalizing by ZIP Code and household income, refine by life stage. 
Look for fresh, new ways to relate to customers and increase the relevance of the message. 

5. Try a new offer. 

What incentive have you been using to get people to respond? 15% discount? If so, try 10% or 25%. Go crazy and try BOGO. How are you encouraging people to log into their personalized microsite? Entrance into a sweepstakes for a gift card? Try a set of concert tickets instead.

Mixing things up can be a great way to stay fresh and relevant, even when sending to the same audience. So get creative. Step outside the box and see what happens. 

Need some ideas? Contact us. We can help!



5 Ways to Trim the Print Budget Without Compromising Results
Want to get better results with a smaller investment? Try these simple tricks. 
 
1. Plan smart. Simple mistakes often can be avoided with a little planning.  Take time to communicate with us about your budget and deadlines, but also the more interpretive elements of the project so we can discuss any challenges we foresee.
 
2. Gang your runs. By placing many projects on the same sheet, or piggybacking on an unused portion of a sheet, we can reduce manpower, plates, and prep time.
 
3. Think "down the line.” Changes become more expensive the further along you are in the print job. Everyone who needs to approve your files should do so before you submit them for printing. Proofread your copy multiple times. Confirm that you’ve prepared your digital files properly, keeping in mind that the resolution of digital files varies greatly.

4. Tweak your paper. Paper can account for 30%–50% of your printing costs, and there are a number of cost-saving measures you can take without adversely affecting your results.  
  • Reduce the size and number of pages. By targeting and segmenting your mailings and information packets, you can often save a lot of money over time.
  • Use thinner paper. Changing the weight can save 10%–15% of your paper costs. 
  • Make subtle changes to brightness. Generally speaking, the brighter the paper, the higher the cost. But few people will notice a slight change in the brightness of your paper, so this is often somewhere you can tighten the belt. 
  • Consider colored papers instead of bleeds. You may be able to create the effect you want less expensively with colored paper instead of ink.    
  • Opt for the house paper. Paper prices fluctuate often, but you can save time and money by using papers we purchase in high volume. Ask us for samples.  
  
5. Remember that boring is your friend. When it comes to print production, you want your print job to be uneventful once it hits the press room. To make this happen, talk to us early and often!

Need more money-saving ideas? Give us a call!



Tips and Tricks for Selecting Colors
Color sells. It increases brand recognition, improves comprehension, and can motivate purchase decisions between products. Color also identifies. The United Parcel Service, IBM, and Home Depot are all synonymous with specific colors. Some companies even trademark colors as brand assets. Think Tiffany’s robin’s egg blue. 

A study by G.A Wright Marketing found that the use of high-quality paper and color applications can increase response rates by nearly 50%. For example, the study showed that a four-color promotional mailer printed on heavy gloss paper stock had a more than 40% higher response rate than an identical three-color version printed on a lighter matte paper stock.

Colors summon emotions and create connections with the people surrounding your brand. Warm colors such as red, orange, and yellow are associated with a range of emotions, from optimism and excitement to violence. Cool colors like green, violet, and blue can be calming and nurturing, but they can also be impersonal and antiseptic. 

Choose colors that will elicit a positive response from recipients, then balance them in a visually appealing way. Using variations of a single color will create a visual effect that is classic and easy on the eyes, but not as vibrant as it could be. Enrich the scheme by introducing analogous colors, selecting three colors next to each other on the color wheel. Examples include red/orange/yellow; green/blue/purple; and yellow/yellow-green/green. Consistently use one shade as the dominant color. 

For higher contrast, select a complementary color scheme, choosing colors across the wheel from each other. This works best when you place a warm color against a cool color, such as red and green, blue and orange, or purple and yellow. Any tint can be used. Midnight blue/tangerine and royal purple/gold are effective combinations.
 
Most any color mix can work as long as you retain harmony and richness in your presentation and avoid the hues used by your competitors. 

Test combinations until you find the scheme that sends the message you want associated with your business. Your customers make split-second decisions based on color, so use it to your advantage.

Need help? Just ask!



Is Your Direct Mail Trustworthy?
People don’t just buy from companies they like. They buy from companies they trust. When you send out direct mail campaigns, it’s important to keep this in mind. Let’s look at five ways you can establish trust with your customers. 
  1. Use solid, believable content. Leave the extravagant claims and cheesy superlatives to the late night infomercials. Make your headlines and body copy factual and believable. Back up your claims. Be specific so people know that you are representing the product accurately.
  2. Write for your audience. If your marketing copy sounds generic, recipients might not feel that your claims are genuine. It’s hard to trust a company that is willing to sell anything to anybody whether they really need it or not. Target your offers, marketing copy, and calls to action to each target audience specifically so they recognize your claims as true. 
  3. Credible design. Marketing copy can be superficial and cheesy, and so can design. If you use five different fonts and clutter the design area with tons of images and an impenetrable sea of text, your piece will look unprofessional. If your design looks unprofessional, your company will too. Avoid super tiny fonts because they make it look as if you are trying to hide something. 
  4. Use real people. Customer testimonials are great for establishing credibility, but they have to be from real life people. Use names, locations, and pictures of smiling faces when possible. Assure readers that these are actual people, not customers you made up.
  5. Proofread your text. Spelling and grammar errors don’t make for a professional image. Have a professional editor or proofreader get a final set of eyes on your copy to ensure that there are no mistakes. 
When it comes to direct mail, there are no shortcuts.  Be sincere. Be credible. Present not just a great product, but a company that people can trust.   



Marketing in a Multichannel World
We are bombarded with electronic media. Cellphones. iPads. Kindles. Nooks. Facebook. Video streaming. Where does print fit? Right square in the middle. 

To be effective, marketing needs to be multi-channel. From a consumer perspective, there isn’t print and online media. There is just marketing. As succinctly stated by Lazar Dzamic of Kitcatt Nohr Digitas, a London-based creative agency, "People don’t think ‘offline’ and ‘online.’ They just see a brand in all its touchpoints.” 

Regardless of channel, marketing success starts with data. You want to gather as much data about your target audience as possible to make the message richer and more effective. You also want present a consistent brand and marketing message across channels.   Here are some best practices to get you started: 
  • Verify and correct existing customer data.
  • Append that data to learn more about each customer.
  • Customize messages based on customer insight. 
  • Personalize consumer interactions across all touchpoints.
  • Integrate communications and present a consistent message across all channels.
When you develop the print portion of your campaigns, focus on those aspects of print that are unique to the medium or that are particularly suited for it: 
  • Use great design that pops off the page in a way not possible on a screen. 
  • Tap into the richness of printed color to create a lasting image. Add special effects such as coating, die-cuts, and embossing.
  • Integrate tactile media, such as textured surfaces or stocks to create a memorable experience.
  • Include product samples, personalized booklets, and other incentives not possible in a digital world. 
Print offers unique benefits that cannot be replicated on a screen. Take advantage of them! 
Need some fresh ideas? Just ask. 



3 Ways to Stretch Your Print Dollars
What goes up must come down. Like everything else, the economy is cyclical. But no matter the current economic conditions, it's important to keep marketing your business. Here are three easy ways you can use some simple changes in your paper selection to help lower your costs without impacting the quality of your print campaigns.   

1. Use less expensive papers. 

Paper prices fluctuate often, so if you haven't standardized on a specific paper, ask about less expensive options. Just because you notice a subtle difference between stocks doesn’t mean your customers will. In fact, they probably won’t. 
If you are mailing multi-page documents, consider switching to a lighter stock. This not only can help you save on paper, but it can help you save on postage, too. 

2. Use the house paper. 

If your piece doesn't demand a specialty paper, opt to use our house stock. House paper isn’t less expensive because it’s lower quality. It’s less expensive because we purchase it in volume and pass the savings on to you. House paper is almost always the least expensive option.

3. Avoid bleeds. 

If color needs to go to the edge of the page, depending on the specs of the job, the job may need to be printed on a larger sheet of paper or on a larger press. This can increase your costs. If you don't include bleeds in your artwork, your project might require less paper or be able to be run on a smaller format press. You might also be able to get a similar effect less expensively by using colored paper.

We are experts at helping our customers succeed with their marketing projects. Talk to us about how we can help you meet your goals.



Personalized Marketing: It's Mainstream
From personalized coupons at the checkout counter to "just for you” recommendations at Amazon.com, personalized marketing is everywhere. 

While some marketers are still deciding whether to take the plunge into this "new” form of marketing in print, fully personalized documents have been around for a long time. Back in 2010 ("Capturing the Cross-Media Direct Marketing Opportunity”), InfoTrends found that the overwhelming majority of marketers were already using segmented (40%) or fully personalized (21%) communications. Only 40% of campaigns fit into the category of "one to many.” This means that if you are sending static mail pieces, you’re competing with marketers who are not only speaking to their customers and prospects on a personalized level, but they are seasoned at doing so.  If your competitors are personalizing and you are not, you are at a competitive disadvantage.  

Need to get started?  Even with a simple basic customer list, here are steps you can take: 

1. Personalize by name. 

Use the recipient’s name creatively. Integrate it into the design in an interesting, eye-catching way. 

2. Target by a single, simple variable. 

Will it help to target the mailing by gender? How about by ZIP code? Would it help to add a map? (This works great for new businesses or new branches or locations.) These are data you already have. Use them!

3. Beef up your marketing database. 

Purchase simple variables like home ownership or household income for the names you already have. Adding to your database is not expensive, and it can boost your marketing effectiveness exponentially. 

Need help? Talk to us about how you can put data to use to create a more personal relationship with your customers. 



3 Reasons to Care About Customer Loyalty
When it comes to boosting revenues, many companies focus on acquiring new customers. In fact, according to Econsultancy’s "Cross-Channel Marketing Report 2014,” 44% of marketers are placing a greater focus on customer acquisition than customer retention. Only 18% are focusing more on customer retention. However, focusing on acquisition to the exclusion of customer retention may not be the best strategy.
 
Here’s why: 

1. The 80-20 rule applies in marketing, too. Research shows that 80% of a company’s revenues come from 20% of its customers. These 20% love your brand and find value in a relationship with your company.  Identifying and courting those customers can be enormously profitable. 

2. The chances of making a sale to a new customer ranges from 5–20%, according to Marketing Metrics. By contrast, the likelihood of selling to an existing customer jumps to 60–70%.  Your existing customers can be your most lucrative. You want to keep them. 

3. According to Peppers & Rogers, it can cost up to seven times more to acquire a new customer than to keep an existing one. For this reason, it can take up to one full year before a new customer becomes profitable. Once you’ve acquired those new customers, you need to keep them. 

On board with customer retention? Let us help you identify your most profitable customers and craft a great customer retention campaign!



 
PrintWave is your go to source for Atlanta, GA Digital Printing. Since 2002 we have been exceeding customers expectations and providing excellent ROI. Contact us today to learn more about our services or request a free estimate.
  

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